What IP professionals are talking about

I Convention name taghave just returned from the annual convention of the Intellectual Property Institute of Canada (IPIC).  This is two-day event with numerous educational workshops for Patent Agents, Trademark Agents and IP Lawyers.  There were plenary sessions that everyone attended and breakout sessions where the audience broke into smaller groups.  The plenary sessions included an address in which Mr. Justice George Locke of the Federal Court provided “tips for having a better relationship with your Judge”, an address by the President of the Canadian Bar Association, Janet Fuhrer, concerning the future of the profession entitled “Reimagining the Ways We Practise”, a panel of experts discussing Crowdfunding, and a panel discussing the issues and opportunities which are being created by 3D printing.  I find Crowdfunding interesting in its various forms.  You can Crowdfund through social media to solicit pre-orders for your product. You can Crowdfund by making an emotional appeal through social media to solicit donations.  Subject to legal limitations imposed by securities regulators, you can also use social media to Crowdfund by selling small equity interests in a start-up venture.  3D printing is considered a “disruptive” technology, because it has the potential to dramatically change the way we do things.  For example, currently there are numerous people employed in the transportation industry.  However, shipping costs can be avoided entirely by simply having a 3D “print shop” in your neighbourhood.  Instead of shipping a replacement part for one of your motor vehicles or household appliances, the part can be “printed” for you.  As with the current issues related to genuine and “pirate” internet sites for music and videos; there will soon be a problem with genuine and “pirate” internet sites that supply the files necessary to print out these parts.  The patent breakout sessions included: a review of key court decisions concerning “the promise of the patent” which have changed the way patents should be prepared; and a session called “Gotcha” which reviewed patent infringement remedies in Canada and the United States.  The trademark/copyright breakout sessions included: a review of changes which are coming to Trademark Law as a result of Canada having  signed a number of treaties ( Nice, Singapore and Madrid); and several sessions on dealing with copyright and trademark issues in  light of the Internet and social media.  It was explained that in this age of social media, the old approach of sending a nasty “cease and desist” letter may backfire.  An unnecessarily heavy-handed cease and desist letter may well be posted on social media and attract comment. Before one can stop it, the matter may go “viral” with the possibility of substantial negative publicity.  An example that was discussed as an alternative approach, was a dispute between the makers of a juice called “Pom Wonderful” and a television host by the name of John Oliver.  The humorous (although somewhat off colour) video can be viewed on YouTube a link for which will be provided below. Why am I relating this information to you?  I believe that by reviewing issues being discussed by IP professions today, you gain insight as to issues which will be touching our lives tomorrow.

Link to Video