News From Canadian Internet Registration Authority (CIRA)

On Monday February 22, 2016 local members of CIRA were invited to a meeting for an update on the activities of CIRA.  We were advised that CIRA is dealing with a number of problems.  A first problem is a shortage of IP addresses.  Internet Protocol Version 4 (IPV4), one of the core protocols of the Internet, uses 32-bit addresses which limits the address space to about 4.3 billion addresses.  There is currently a move to Internet Protocol Version 6 (IPV6).   With IPV6 the platform has been increased to128-bit addresses. This will provide enough IP addresses for the foreseeable future.  However, one cannot move seamlessly from IPV4 to IPV6, as the technologies do not talk to each other.  IPV4 will be supported for a number of years to allow users to switch over to IPV6 and then IPV4 will be discontinued.  Of 2.4 million .ca websites, only 40,000 have been built on the IPV6 platform to date.  There are websites still being set up using IPV4.  If you are working with websites, it is important that IPV6 be used, as IPV4 will be obsolete in a number of years.  The transition to IPV6 will be slow, as IPV6 is not compatible with some hardware.  There is, of course, a reluctance to spend the money to upgrade hardware, until the date for discontinuing IPV4 is drawing near. The incentive for switching to IPV6 is that it reduces network access bottlenecks that currently are experienced.  A second problem relates to routing. The Canadian internet uses many United States based internet exchange points.  This results in most Canadian internet traffic being routed through the United States.  There was a discussion regarding further developing more Canadian peer to peer shortcuts so that Canadian internet traffic can be more autonomous.   A third problem relates to domain name system security.  There are individuals who make their living by “highjacking” domain names.  They change domain name system authorization information and then redirect internet traffic.  To avoid having your domain name “highjacked” CIRA has provision for “locks” to secure your information.  There is a configuration test you can perform at the CIRA website to determine whether your information has been “locked” [dntests.CIRA.ca].   Security can also be upgraded by using “anycast” as opposed to “unicast” systems.  There are digital signatures that can be used for authentication.  There is a configuration test you can perform at the CIRA website to check to see whether  digital signature authentication (DNSSEC) is enabled [performance.CIRA.ca].https://cira.ca/soi